Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Tomato Soup Cake and other intrigues ...


RED ALERT: SOME PROFOUNDLY INFANTILE, MISCHIEF-MINDED SCALAWAGS HAVE ATTEMPTED TO SEND THIS BLOG TO HUNDREDS OF EMAIL ADDRESSES WHICH ARE INACCURATE OR NO LONGER VALID. I KNOW NOT HOW TO REMEDY THIS, BUT IF YOU RECEIVE SUSPICIOUS NOTICES, THROW THEM OUT AND VISIT SLOANEVIEW AT SOME OTHER TIME WHEN THESE DASTARDLY DEMONS GO SOMEWHERE ELSE TO PLAY.
-SLOANE

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MEANTIME ....

As is glaringly obvious, the color scheme for SloaneView has undergone a significant alteration. It's jazzed up really, and since red is my favorite color, I am very much enjoying the change from the previous design.

It's not just a new color scheme. Some items called gadgets have been moved. For example, SloaneView Links Of Interest, which is still under construction, can be found at the bottom of the page. These are sites I visit with some regularity. I will be adding more in the coming weeks. The Arts Journal site is especially informative since it announces cultural events, art exhibits, concert and museum news, and even lists job openings at various arts-related venues.

Some of the names on the Links List are jazz musicians of note, i.e., Bill Charlap, Dave Frishberg and Mike Renzi are among my favorite piano players whose appearances and recorded works are important and valuable. I hope your music library contains at least some of their considerable recorded output.

Jazz journalists Doug Ramsey and Mark Myers publish blogs I visit daily. Informative, up-to-date information reported with accuracy and an obvious devotion to jazz in all its glory. You will find these sites interesting and entertaining.

Jazz author and videographer Joan Merrill has an enviable reputation for her integrity and dedication to all things jazz with an emphasis on the art of the jazz singer. Her site also features the news of the creation of a female, jazz-loving character named Detective Casey McKie in a series of murder mysteries which take place in and around the San Francisco area. Disclaimer: I have written a favorable comment for the book titled
"And All That Madness" which reads as follows:

"Author Joan Merrill has produced yet another captivating mystery as part of her on-going detective series featuring SF detective Casey McKie. As usual, Ms. Merrill has masterfully blended woven her love of jazz and its practitioners into a tale of intrigue and revenge, all set to the beat of the blues and be-bop. A colorful, exceptionally intelligent thriller, most highly recommended."

You will notice a web site link for the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge because I think it's important to keep a sharp eye on them especially during their current tour of Australia toting the baby Prince George about the place. I have been fascinated with the Royal Family since the age of ten when I demanded to be awakened to listen to the BBC radio broadcast of the 1947 wedding of Princes Elizabeth to Philip Mountbatten who was born June 10, 1921, on the Greek island of Corfu. If you do the math, the Duke of Edinburgh is today a surprisingly robust 93 years old. Her Majesty The Queen is a spry 88. And Queen Elizabeth, The Queen Mother, lived to the age of 102. Ah, those Windsor genes. All things related to the Royals can be found at The House Of Windsor link at the bottom of this page.

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JUST TO ADD A BIT OF VISUAL INTEREST ....

This photo of Bill Charlap and I was taken by my friend Jill Goldman on Friday, March 21, 2014, at The Regatta Bar located in The Charles Hotel, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Bill had invited me to sit in, and the silly grin on my face attests that I had just experienced the thrill of it all.





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THE CAKE RECIPE

I wish I could tell you where I found this wonderfully easy recipe from a lady named Marian Bull, but I reprint it here exactly as I found it. This is a sort of poor man's carrot cake, and the texture is moist and delicious. Of course, the cream cheese frosting is a big plus. I hope you enjoy making this one as much as I did. -CS

Tomato Soup Cake
By Marian Bull

This was my grandmother Ruthie's recipe, a technique that Irish immigrants apparently relied on when short on money and fresh ingredients. It tastes nothing like tomato soup, I assure you; but rather like a nice spice cake, spotted with raisins, best with a cream cheese frosting. This recipe was originally printed, sans raisins, in Linda Bassett's From Apple Pie to Pad Thai: Neighborhood Cooking North of Boston (Commonwealth Editions, 2002).

Makes One 2-layer cake

•2 cups all-purpose flour
•1 1/3 cup sugar
•4 teaspoons baking powder
•1 teaspoon baking soda
•1 1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
•1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
•1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
•1 10 3/4-ounce can condensed tomato soup (Campbell's is most traditional)
•1/2 cup shortening (or butter)
•2 large eggs
•1/4 cup water
•1 cup raisins

•Cream cheese frosting

1.Preheat oven to 350° F. Grease and flour two 8-inch round cake pans, shaking out any excess flour.

2.In a large mixing bowl, combine the dry ingredients. Add the soup, shortening, eggs, and water. Beat together until everything forms a smooth (pink!) batter. Fold in raisins. Pour the batter into the cake pans, doing your best to get the same amount in each.

3.Bake for 35 to 40 minutes; when the cake is done, the tines of a fork should come out clean.

4.Let cake cool completely before frosting; my mother says that Ruthie would likely frost each layer, and leave the sides bare.

mmmmm...mmmmmm good!

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